New Polymer to Detect Early Acute Kidney Injury

A new polymer developed by a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw could save many lives through early detection of acute kidney injury also known as AKI. The polymer works by trapping lipocalin-2 (NGAL), a protein which is elevated in the blood…

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Protective Protein Works with Statins to Prevent AKI

Researchers from Keio University in Japan have discovered how statins and the protein KL4, found in endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of the kidney, can help prevent acute kidney injury. Experiments in mice showed that endothelial KL4 (Kruppel-like factor 4) protects kidneys by suppressing inflammation and represents a promising…

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Sox9 Gene Activates Healing Response in Kidney Cells

A research team led by scientists in Dr. Andy McMahon’s lab at the Broad California Institute of Regenerative Medicine at USC, has discovered the crucial role that the Sox9 gene plays in kidney repair after acute kidney injury (AKI). The work of lead author, Sanjeev Kumar, M.D., Ph.D., was funded…

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Researchers Identify Protein Key to Kidney Cell Repair

Researchers from Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have discovered that MG53, a protein found in kidney cells, is essential to repair following acute kidney injury (AKI). Earlier studies at the university revealed the protein’s role in repairing cells in the heart, lung and skeletal muscle. The discovery points to…

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Biomarkers Linked to Long-Term Kidney Damage, Death in AKI Patients

An international research team led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine has linked high levels of TIMP2 and IGFBP7, two biomarkers for acute kidney injury (AKI), to long-term kidney damage, the risk of needing dialysis or a transplant, and death in patients in the early stages of the disease. The…

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Stem Cell Scientists Lay TRAP for Kidney Disease

Scientists from Dr. Andrew McMahon’s stem cell lab at USC have uncovered the cellular responses that occur within damaged kidneys by using a unique “TRAP” mouse model. Their research builds upon TRAP (translating ribosome affinity purification), a method used to tag ribosomes, molecular structures that contain RNA and are responsible…

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